Cincy FunCincinnati Fun

Cincinnati Quiz

Test your local knowledge with our quiz on Cincinnati's history...
(answers are at the end of the quiz)

True/False
The 'Seven Hills of Cincinnati' total more than seven.

True/False
In November of 1843 John Quincy Adams laid the Observatory's cornerstone in what is known today as Mt Adams.

True/False
In June 2005, City Council approved the revamping of Fountain Square which included the moving of the Tyler Davidson fountain at a cost of nearly $42 million.

True/False
Waite Hoyt, the Reds radio announcer (long before Marty and Joe), was a roommate and a pallbearer of Babe Ruth.

True/False
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow coined the term "The Queen City" for Cincinnati.

True/False
Cincinnati's original name was Losantiville (city across from the 'L' - Licking River).

True/False 
Cincinnati was named for the Society of the Cincinnati, America's first Veteran's organization which was founded by the officers of the Continental Army in 1783.

True/False
Graeter's flagship store opened in Hyde Park Square and is still there.

True/False
Findlay Market is Ohio's oldest Public Market.

True/False
Uncle Al (Lewis) and his wife, Wanda (Captain Wendy) were on the tube for a quarter of a century.

True/False
The first Catholic church of Cincinnati was built in 1819 and the Archdiocese was established by Bishop Edward Fenwick in 1821.

True/False
The Cincinnati Zoological Garden opened on September 18, 1875 making it the second oldest zoo in the U.S.

True/False
Major floods in Cincinnati occurred in 1832, 1884, 1913, 1937 and 1997.  The highest at 80 feet was in 1937 when 15% of the city was under water.

True/False
In the 1880's Cincinnati was the 6th largest city in the U.S.

True/False
Mount Ida was renamed to Mount Adams in honor of John Quincy Adams, our 6th U.S. President.


True/False
Mount Adams was controlled by Nicholas Longworth, who used the land for growing grapes and developing his wine business.


True/False
The Miami - Erie Canal was affectionately called "The Rhine" by the German immigrants of Cincinnati.  Drained and now under Central Parkway brought about the name of "Over-The-Rhine" as an area of downtown Cincinnati.

True/False
The Reptile House at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden is the oldest building in use at any U.S. zoo.

True/False
$6 million was spent to use the bed of the Miami - Erie Canal to build a downtown subway in Cincinnati.  The surface was paved over to form Central Parkway.  Funds ran out before the subway was completed.

True/False
The Observatory was moved from Mt Adams to Mt Lookout in 1873.

True/False
The Germans, known for exercising, established physical education programs in Cincinnati's schools which set the benchmark for U.S. schools.

True/False
Harriet Beecher Stowe, daughter of a school headmaster, based her book "Uncle Tom's Cabin" on her upbringing in Cincinnati.

True/False
William Procter and James Gamble were brothers-in-law.

True/False
Lytle Park was named after William Lytle, a General from the Civil War.

True/False
The Herbivora Building (Elephant House) built in 1906 at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden is the largest and most complete concrete animal building in the world (length: 150', width: 75', height: 75').  It's one of the most spectacular historic buildings in the zoo world and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

True/False
The Roebling Suspension Bridge, named after it's designer - John A. Roebling, was the longest suspension bridge in the world in 1866.  It  maintained this status until completion of the Brooklyn Bridge in 1883 also designed by John Roebling.

True/False
These "events" occurred in Cincinnati during the 1870's:  the Cincinnati Zoo, Burnett Woods and Eden Park were opened and Music Hall, The Tyler Davidson Fountain and Cincinnati's first Incline were built.

True/False
The Tyler Davidson Fountain was cast from an old bronze cannon, bought by Henry Probasco in Bavaria and named in honor of his brother-in-law / business partner and dedicated in 1871.

True/False
Cincinnati's Mabley and Carew department store happened by accident.  In 1877,  Detroit merchants Christopher Mabley and Joseph Carew missed their late train bound for Memphis and wound up starting a business near Fountain Square.

True/False
The five Cincinnati inclines were:  Bellevue Incline (a.k.a. Elm Street Incline); Fairview Incline; Mount Adams Incline; Mount Auburn Incline (a.k.a. Main Street Incline) and Price Hill Incline.

True/False
Within 2 years, from 1884 to 1886, two major buildings moved to atop Mount Adams - The Art Museum and Rookwood Pottery.

True/False
Coney Island was built on an apple orchard along the Ohio River.

True/False
Arbor Day started in Cincinnati in the 1880's.

True/False
Before Henry Ford made Detroit the Motor City, Cincinnati made 50% of the carriages and carts in the U.S.

True/False
Hughes High School was named after Thomas Hughes, an English cobbler, who bequeathed money to the school when he died.

True/False
In the Gay '90's there were over 100 watering holes between 5th Street and McMillian.  There were over 20 watering holes between 12th and 13th streets.

True/False
There use to be a horse track in Oakley before the turn of the 20th Century.

True/False
Cincinnati's first tennis court was built in 1878.

True/False
University of Cincinnati's first building in Clifton was McMicken Hall named after the $1 million donor - Charles McMicken.

True/False
UC was the first university in the country to teach Natural Sciences, Civil Engineering and Co-Op Programs for Technology.

True/False
The statue of President James Garfield, now in Piatt Park, actually stood in the middle of 8th and Race Street.

True/False 
The acronym CG&E stood for the Cincinnati Gas and Electric Company; but the company was originally known as Cincinnati Gas, Light and Coke Company.

True/False
Seasongood Pavillion in Eden Park was named after Murray Seasongood, a Cincinnati Mayor in the 1920's.

True/False
Victory Parkway was formerly known as Bloody Run Blvd.

True/False
Nippert Stadium was opened for UC football in 1924.

True/False
Xavier University was formerly known as St Xavier College and the land was that of the old Avondale Athletic Club.

True/False
Union Terminal, the train station, opened in 1931.

True/False 
The first night baseball game was played in Cincinnati at Crosley Field in 1935.  Speaking of Cincinnati baseball, Red's Johnny Vandermeer still holds the Major League Record of pitching 2 consecutive no-hitters.

True/False
Empress Chili got its name from a burlesque show next door and Skyline Chili got its name from the view of the city from the kitchen at its original location in Price Hill.

True/False
The Cincinnati Reds went undefeated in 1869 and won the World Series in 1919, 1939, 1940, 1975, 1976 and 1990.

True/False
The area's airport "The Greater Cincinnati / Northern Kentucky Airport" isn't located in Cincinnati nor in the state of Ohio.  Its Airport Code - CVG stands for Covington, KY where the airport is located.  Before construction of the original airport Federal agents confiscated a large still, hundreds of gallons of mash and barrels for storage.

True/False
The Ohio State Fair that now opens in Columbus, OH each year originated in Cincinnati in 1850.

True/False
Robert Taft, son of William Howard Taft and father of Robert Jr, was born in Cincinnati in 1889 and ranked # 1 in his undergraduate class at Yale (1910) and Havard Law School (1913).  

SCROLL DOWN FOR THE CORRECT ANSWERS.

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
All answers are true to the best of our knowledge!!!!

Check back for more facts about the Cincinnati area.

If you have any other facts of Cincinnati e-mail us at cincy2u@fuse.net .

Search

Home  ·  Search  ·  About Us  ·  Contact Us  ·  Shipping  ·  Privacy Policy  ·  Links
All prices are reflected in US dollars
Copyright © Campisano Unlimited LLC Cincinnati, OH
cincy2u@fuse.net